Tag Archives: climate change

Michael Mann, Ph.D. to Speak at Le Moyne College

IPCC_2001_3rd Assessment_Report_SPMThe ongoing assault on climate science in the United States has never been more aggressive, more blatant, or more widely publicized than in the furor surrounding the so-called Hockey Stick–a clear and compelling graph of scientific data constructed by Dr. Michael E. Mann and his colleagues to demonstrate that global temperatures have risen in conjunction with the increase in industrialization and the use of fossil fuels dating back to 1000 AD. The graph was featured in the high-profile “Summary for Policy Makers” of the 2001 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and quickly became an icon in the debate over human-caused (“anthropogenic”) climate change.

MannTree-highresJoin us on Monday, November 2nd at 5:30 p.m. in Le Moyne College’s Panasci Family Chapel as we host a lecture by Michael E. Mann, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Meteorology and Director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University. Professor Mann will tell the story behind the Hockey Stick, using it as a vehicle for exploring broader issues regarding the role of skepticism in science, the uneasy relationship between science and politics, and the dangers that arise when special economic interests and those who do their bidding attempt to skew the discourse over policy-relevant areas of science. In short, Professor Mann will use the Hockey Stick to cut through the fog of disinformation that has been generated by the campaign to deny the reality of climate change and, in so doing, will reveal the very real threat to our future that lies behind it.

Dr. Michael E. Mann received his undergraduate degrees in Physics and Applied Math from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.S. degree in Physics from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in Geology & Geophysics from Yale University. He is the recipient of 27 honors and awards, the author of more than 180 peer-reviewed and edited publications, and has published two books including Dire Predictions: Understanding Global Warming (Pearson/DK Publishing, 2008) and The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches from the Front Lines (Columbia University Press, 2012).

For additional information on Professor Mann and his work, we suggest listening to this interview with Andrea Milan as they discuss the impact of anthropogenic climate change on a geological perspective; reading this June 2015 interview by Stefanie Penn Spear, Founder and CEO of EcoWatch, entitled “Michael Mann’s Dire Predictions Provides Ultimate Guide on Understanding Climate Change;” or watching this brief September 28th, 2015 interview that aired on The Weather Channel in which Professor Mann discussed the “cold blob” in the Atlantic Ocean, its correlation to global warming, and the implication for humanity.

Additional information is also available on Professor Mann’s website.

This talk is part of an ongoing series of lectures devoted to Sustaining Earth: Insights from Science and Religion. It is free and open to the public. For more information please call 315-445-6200 or e-mail mcdevittcenter@lemoyne.edu.

Klee Presents Research on Climate Change and Bird Migration

photo-9Christopher Klee ’15, McDevitt Scholar in Ecology, presented findings of his research, “Earlier Spring Arrival Dates of Migrating Birds Verified in New York and Massachusetts,” at the annual meeting of the New York State Ornithological Association in Ithaca, N.Y. on September 19-21, 2014. Klee found the average spring arrival dates for New York birds in years following 1993 were 34 days earlier and short-distance migrants arrived earlier than long-distance migrants. For Massachusetts birds, spring arrival dates averaged 25 days earlier and short-distance migrants also arrived earlier. Klee also presented evidence that some species appear to have become winter residents, suggesting that the migratory patterns of both short-distance and long-distance species, either breeding in or passing through northeastern states, are increasingly influenced by climate change. Christopher Klee, with Steven Houck ’14 and faculty advisor, Dr. Donald McCrimmon, hope to submit their results for publication later this academic year.