Category Archives: Student Scholars

Graig and Rizzo Publish Article

Travis Graig’s ’17 and Christopher Rizzo’s ’15 article ‘Data Challenges in Dynamic, Large-Scale Resource Allocation in Remote Regions’ was recently accepted for publication in Safety Science, the #3 journal for international safety research*.  Both Graig and Rizzo are 2015-16 McDevitt Undergraduate Research Fellows in Information Systems.

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Travis Graig ’17

Travis’ analysis of Bering Strait vessel transits was also highlighted for its contribution in identifying missing and conflicting data in the variety of data sets he analyzed in his research.

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Christopher Rizzo ’15

Chris’ work to develop a resource allocation database for Arctic oil spill response was heralded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Coast Guard, as it modeled the data, resources and equipment necessary to respond to a catastrophic oil spill in the Arctic.

Congratulations Travis and Chris!

* Grabowski, M.R, Graig, T. & Rizzo, C. 2016. Data Challenges in Dynamic, Large-Scale Resource Allocation  in Remote Regions. Safety Science. doi: 10.1016/jssci.2016.03.021.

 

Middleton and Martial Participate in Arctic Council Session

Last week, Steven Middleton ’16 and Jonathan Martial ’17, the McDevitt Undergraduate Research Fellows in Information Systems, were invited to the Fall meeting of the National Academy of Sciences’ Transportation Research Board/Marine Board in Washington, DC. The Board ran a focus session on Arctic Emergency Response that was led by ADM Robert Papp, USCG (retired), the US Special Arctic Representative and Chair of the Arctic Council, and RADM Charles Michel, USCG, the Vice Commandant of the Coast Guard.

RADM Mark Guadagnini, Head of Shell’s Emergency Response Operations; Mark Myers, the Commissioner of Natural Resources for the State of Alaska; and Todd Busch, Senior VP of Crowley, Inc., whose ships run through the Arctic, were also on the dais.

The Arctic Council is an intergovernmental policy group supported by the State Department and linked to the UN that develops through consensus among its 8 nation members and 23 observer nations (including India, China, Singapore many European nations and indigenous groups) Arctic policies, plans and regulations. Also in attendance at the meeting last Thursday were the Russian representatives to the Arctic Council.

Steven and Jon captured notes and provided support to the Marine Board during the focus session. Their research topics center on challenges in Arctic search and rescue, so the focus session and the opportunity to interview, have lunch with, and converse with senior US officials with international responsibilities for Arctic programs was a unique opportunity for undergraduate research fellows.

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Jonathan Martial ’17, Todd Ripley (Maritime Administration), and Steven Middleton ’16 at the Arctic Council Session in Washington, DC.

Three Awarded McDevitt Fellowships in Information Systems

The McDevitt Center would like to congratulate Jonathan Martial ’17, Steven Middleton ’16, and Jean-Phillipe Rancy ’16 on their selection as McDevitt Undergraduate Fellows in Information Systems for the 2015-16 academic year.  Each McDevitt Fellow will work closely with Dr. Martha Grabowski, Distinguished McDevitt Professor in Information Systems. Martial and Middleton will develop research projects around arctic search and rescue models and Rancy will continue his research developing Google Glass applications for ship navigation.  In addition, the Fellows and will participate in regular research meetings led by Dr. Grabowski. This fellowship includes a $4,000 stipend.

(Picture by Dr. Martha Grabowski.  From left to right: Jonathan Martial, Jean-Phillipe Rancy, and Steven Middleton)

Ten Receive Prestigious McDevitt Fellowship in Natural Science Award

The McDevitt Center would like to congratulate the following ten students selected as McDevitt Undergraduate Fellows in Natural Science for the 2015-16 academic year.  Each McDevitt Fellow will work closely with a Le Moyne College faculty mentor while conducting hands on research in one of Le Moyne’s labs or in the field.  In addition, the Fellows and their mentors will participate in a monthly research seminar led by Father George Coyne, McDevitt Chair in Physics, at which they will present their research and discuss its progress. This prestigious fellowship includes a $4,000 stipend.

Daniel Bolster ‘16 (mentor: Dr. Donald McCrimmon)
Anna Curtin ‘17 (mentor: Dr. Hilary McManus)
Ronald Lowe ’16 (mentor: Dr. Devon Keeney)
Nicholas Macoretta ’16 (mentor: Dr. Hilary McManus)
Tiffany Meador ‘16 (mentor: Dr. Hilary McManus)
Xavier Schafer ’16 (mentor: Dr. Michael Masingale)
Joseph Shupperd ‘16 (mentor: Dr. Christopher Bass)
Andrew Tynon ‘16 (mentor: Dr. Patrick Yurco)
Anna Valentine ’16 (mentor: Dr. Donald McCrimmon)
Brian Wilson ’17 (mentor: Dr. Anna O’Brien)

This year’s award recipients will be researching a myriad of topics ranging from fish hybridization, green algae, electronic thin films, environmental pollution, and bird migration patterns as it correlates to climate change.

Bolster and McCrimmon Travel to Learn About Historical Bird Migration Data

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Dan Bolster and biologist Jessica Zelt, Program Coordinator, review historical, hand-written records that have been digitized and entered into the Bird Phenology Program database.

Dr. Donald McCrimmon, McDevitt Research Associate and McDevitt Undergraduate Research Fellow in the Natural Sciences student Dan Bolster traveled to Laurel, MD July 21st and 22nd to the offices of the Bird Phenology Program (BPP) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. McCrimmon and Bolster (’16), along with undergraduates Steven Houck (’14), Chris Klee (’15) and Anna Valentine (’16), have been investigating changes in the timing of spring migration during the 20th and early 21st Centuries. Their analyses of records compiled by the Cayuga Bird Club in New York (dating to 1903) and the Forbush Bird Club in Massachusetts (dating to 1932) show that 69 bird species have demonstrated statistically significant earlier yearly first observation dates in both regions, suggesting possible relationships to changes in temperatures over time.

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In a blind overlooking a holding area for Whooping Cranes, Dan Bolster holds an adult crane model used by investigators during behavioral studies.

While they probe that linkage using data provided by the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, they are also very interested in extending the migration observations further back in time. They will use BPP data for that purpose. The BPP is a collection of millions of migration card observations, dating back to the mid to late 1800s and illuminating almost a century of migration patterns and population status of birds. While there, McCrimmon and Bolster were treated to a behind-the-scenes tour of the PWRC’s other research projects including the Bird Banding Laboratory, endangered Whooping Cranes, and a variety of sea ducks.

Jack Nelson ’16 Receives Prestigious Internship at MIT’s Dalai Lama Center

Jack Nelson ’16 (Philosophy), a self-described advocate and feminist, believes it is necessary for today’s youth to have a realistic understanding of, and to actively engage with, pressing social concerns facing American society. As a Resident Advisor at Le Moyne College and youth counselor at the East Fayetteville YMCA, Nelson has worked with particular urgency to combat exclusion based on various forms of difference. Believing that the first step to promoting greater inclusion is to identify the thoughts and attitudes that motivate exclusion, Nelson is working to create a unique peer advocacy program that seeks to identify and help those who exclude and victimize others. This summer, Nelson will have the opportunity to continue developing his peer advocacy program through a one-of-a-kind internship opportunity at the Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at M.I.T. in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The six-week internship will provide Nelson with hands on training in becoming an ethical leader for the 21st century. Beginning with a guided introduction to the Dalai Lama Center’s mission and activities, Nelson will work with the Dalai Lama Center to develop, implement, and test a pilot version of his peer advocacy project.

The Dalai Lama Center Internship Program was designed specifically for Le Moyne students and Jack was awarded this prestigious internship opportunity following a competitive and comprehensive application process.

The McDevitt Center congratulates Jack Nelson.

2015 McDevitt Summer Internship and Research Grant Recipients Announced

TThe McDevitt Summer Internship and McDevitt Summer Research Programs were developed by the McDevitt Center in order to strengthen undergraduate programs in the McDevitt disciplines while also enhancing Le Moyne’s support for student internships and research.  The programs award grants of $3,000 each to as many as 20 students per year who are majoring or minoring in Computer Science, Management/Information Systems, Philosophy, Physics or Religious Studies and who secure high-quality unpaid internships, paid internships that involve unusually high costs, or laboratory or field research opportunities.

For the summer of 2015, thirteen students have been awarded these competitive Summer Internship and Research Grants.

The McDevitt Center congratulates:

Internship Grant Recipients
Michael B. Abbott II ’17
YoonJi Lee ’17
Ronald J. Lowe ’16
Gerald D. Matarazzo ’16
John M. Nelson ’16
Sarah Touey ’18
Dominic P. Uliano IV ’18

Research Grant Recipients
Ryan J. Bonk ’16
Anna M. Curtin ’17
Katelynn E. Roffo ’16
Melissa A. Schmitz ’16
Joseph D. Shupperd ’16
Spencer J. Stuckey ’16

Fourteen Students Receive Competitive McDevitt Summer Internship Grants

The McDevitt Summer Internship Grants Program was developed by the McDevitt Center for Creativity and Innovation in order to enhance Le Moyne’s support for student internships.  The program awards grants of $3,000 each to as many as 20 students per year who are majoring in Computer Science, Management/Information Systems, Philosophy/Religious Studies, and Physics and who secure high-quality unpaid internships, paid internships that involve unusually high costs, or research opportunities in labs.

For the summer of 2014, fourteen students have been awarded these competitive Summer Internship Grants.  The McDevitt Center congratulates:

Ryan Bonk ’16, Physics (Pre-Engineering) and Mathematics
Dara DeGennaro ’15, Management/Information Systems and Business Analytics
Taylor Glausen ’15, Religious Studies, Biology (Neurobiology concentration), and Visual Arts
Thomas Hilgenberg ’15, Management/Information Systems
Acheampong Johnson ’15, Management/Information Systems and Computer Science
Alexsis Long-Ekomin ’15, Religious Studies
Samantha Maggio ’15, Philosophy, Chemistry (Pre-Engineering), and Mathematics
Alexander Marji ’17, Philosophy
Robert McCall ’15, Philosophy, Psychology, and History
Akash Mitra ’15, Management/Information Systems
Maria Ramirez ’15, Religious Studies, Biology, and Environmental Studies
Joseph Shupperd ’16, Physics (Pre-Engineering) and Mathematics
Spencer Stuckey ’16, Physics and Chemistry
Zachary Tucker ’16, Management/Information Systems and Finance

Marji and McCall Receive Prestigious Internship

Robert McCall ’15 and Alexander Marji ’17

Alexander Marji ’17 (Philosophy) and Robert McCall ’15 (Philosophy, Psychology, and History) have always wanted to be involved in something larger than themselves. They both have a desire to help others – Marji through medical ethics and McCall through social work. This summer, both Marji and McCall will get the chance to develop their own leadership potential in these and other areas during a one-of-a-kind internship opportunity at the Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at M.I.T. in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The six-week internship will provide Marji and McCall with hands on training in becoming ethical leaders for the 21st Century. Beginning with a guided introduction to the Dalai Lama Center’s mission and activities, they will each go on to develop, implement, and test a project that aligns with both their own interests and the Center’s programs.

This internship program was designed specifically for Le Moyne students by the Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at M.I.T. in partnership with the McDevitt Center for Creativity and Innovation. According to their mission statement, The Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values is dedicated to inquiry, dialogue, and education on the ethical and humane dimensions of life. As a collaborative and nonpartisan think tank, The Center focuses on the development of interdisciplinary research and programs in varied fields of knowledge, from science and technology to education and international relations. Their programs emphasize responsibility and examine meaningfulness and moral purpose between individuals, organizations, and societies.

Marji and McCall were chosen to represent Le Moyne in this prestigious internship opportunity after a competitive and comprehensive application process.

The McDevitt Center congratulates Alexander Marji ’17 and Robert McCall ’15.

Ashley Strazzella, McDevitt I.S. Scholar, Receives Prestigious Internship Opportunity

Ashley Strazzella ’14 (Biological Sciences, Pre-Med, and Physics) has always hoped to one day be part of an integrative center that incorporates many disciplines of Eastern and Alternative medicine into one cooperative healing center, giving patients a range of treatments available in one location. She will begin to fulfill these dreams when she travels to Kenchanahalli, India this fall to intern at a small Ayurvedic hospital. There, under the guidance of Shindu Suresh, the Internship Director, she will be shadowing Ayurveda professionals through their daily routine of patient treatment. She will also study the basics of Ayurveda, explore Ayurvedic texts while completing field-work, observe treatment in action, and practice preventative therapies which include daily yoga and meditation.

Strazzella, a native of Buffalo, New York, will graduate from Le Moyne College this May with a Bachelor’s Degree in Biological Sciences, a minor in Physics and a concentration in pre-medical studies. She will continue her studies in the fall of 2015 and will be attending graduate school to study Eastern Medicine.